Thursday, September 27, 2012



Watching medical shows gives one enough of the lingo to realize STAT means in a hurry, quickly, right now. Our subscription to STAT!Ref provides our students with  immediate access to a  complete medical  reference library. The mobile app provides on-the-go information at their fingertips.
26 titles were selected from the collection. These are accessible through the catalog. Type in Stat!Ref to pull them up.
We do have a varied collection of medical resources to support our programs. Check us out. The health resources are just below the citations resources.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Changing view

The view  has changed from where I sit. In June, I noted the wooden wall was removed as the renovation of the Student Center was being completed. The Student Center is now finished. Students are gathering to study, chat, and eat.

Through the arch just outside the library, can be seen a green circle picture on the far wall. It reminds me of those Fair art projects where you drip paint on a spinning piece of paper. There's a happy feel to it. The windows are just barely visible, giving a hint of what the weather is like.

picture c. Henry Estes, Sept 2012

Henry Estes has done a series of exterior and interior shots of the renovated space. If you squint, you can just  see the Library edge through the opening to the lobby which is to the right of the brown weave rectangle.

Soon the library space will begin its transformation. My View will really be different!


A long summer

It's been awhile since I posted. The thought had been running through my head to just stop posting. Time slipped by and it was easier and easier to let the blog wither. Till this morning when a faculty member e-mailed how much they enjoyed the View from the Library. I was touched and inspired, so here I am, back again.

A friend on Facebook posted the link to Emily Asher-Perrins' blog on the 25th Anniversary of the movie, The Princess Bride.  25 years, time does speed by. It is the only movie I've seen twice in one day. My sons, now 38 and 35, were the impetus to see the movie. Immediately when it was over, I said, Daddy has to see this. We went home and got Dad,  to return to the movie theatre that very day to see it again. "As you wish".

World Cat offers a way to find out which library has the movie or William Goldman's book that inspired the movie. If you're not close to a computer but you have a smart phone, World Cat Mobile lets you check who has what and where, while you're on the go.



Friday, June 15, 2012

The walls are down

Last October a wooden wall was erected between us and the construction area for new entry. Today the wall is coming down. It looks like the student area will be usable by August, for sure!

Rumor has it, the library on the North Metro campus will be enlarged when the entry area is completed. Our view will definitely change.


Wednesday, May 30, 2012

In the voting mood?

is holding an election for your favorite library blog.

The View from the Library began in May 2005. Our purpose has been to talk about what we see from the circulation desk at the North Metro campus of Chattahoochee Technical College. We talk about events and resources. The resources range from books to online databases. Our emphasis has been on the online resources available through GALILEO. Our audience has been those involved in academics at the school.

The View is in Salem's directory of Library blogs (I’ve asked them to edit the institution to reflect the merger with CTC). Please do consider nominating  the View. Seven years, oh my.


Memory Eternal- Leo Dillon

Sharron McElmeel has written a very touching testimonial to the memory of Leo Dillon.

The Dillon's Caldecott award titles were a staple in my Caldecott unit for second graders. February became the Dillon's author of the month slot with 8 of the books they illustrated read to first graders. The illustrators were an important part of my work with elementary children.

Thank you, Sharon, for sharing your memories. Thank you, Leo, for sharing your talent.

You can learn more about the work of Leo and Dianne Dillon by going to GALILEO, selecting Databases A-Z, selecting N, and going to Novelist K-8.

Skimming the list of 51 titles illustrated by Leo and Dianne, I saw the reprise of Margaret Wise Brown's book about the Two Little Trains. The illustrations are very different from their Caldecott winners. The reviews reveal warm details about the illustrations. Doing a quick compare and contrast has been most refreshing!

Your Georgia librarian can give you the current password to GALILEO.


Thursday, May 24, 2012

Seven Year Itch

A peek at the start date for this blog, startled me. I've been writing for seven years.

May 4, 2005, when the library entry was opened up with glass panels replacing the solid wood doors, is the date of my first blogging entry. Our view then was of the passing throng in the hallway. Soon we'll have an expanded view of the Student Area. The renovation begun last fall is coming to a close. Walls have been removed and huge glass expanses have been created. What will we see in the next seven years?



Citations are the bane of my existence. My library information spiel tells students the formula for a citation is "who did it, what did they do, how does my reader find it". That formula sets eyes a glowing because it isn't  difficult. It's the punctuation that causes consternation.

To help students with citations, we subscribe to the enhanced EasyBib. I have shown students how it works. Just fill in the blanks with the correct information. That can become tricky but it isn't impossible to do.
Today I learned one can type or scan in an ISBN number. EasyBib will create the complete citation. My mouth dropped open. How easy is that?

It works great with books but what about journal articles? Most students citing an article, have retrieved the article from vendors that  provide a citation. EasyBib will provide a citation for an article that has a DOI number. Finding an article with a DOI number isn't as easy as it sounds. Not every article has a DOI number. Scholarly journals seem to have DOI's while 'regular' articles do not.

Truly, there is no excuse for not citing your sources correctly when you're provided a tool like EasyBib.


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Look who is 60!

Charlotte's Web is a classic children's story that was first published in 1952. It's hard to believe it is sixty years old. The story seems fresh each time it is read aloud. There is someting about friendship that is timeless.  The  setting is the least familiar space for most sub-urban and urban dwellers - the barn.  Michael Sims, blog author, wrote  The Story of Charlotte's Web [PS3545 H5187 Z925 2011]  which he began by noting he was "standing in the barn that had belonged to E.B.White". The real barn where E.B. White discovered Charlotte, Wilbur and Templeton.

Find out more about "E. B. White's eccentric life in nature and the birth of an American classic" by reading The Story of Charlotte's Web [PS3545 H5187 Z925 2011].


The Alexandria Link

Plucked randomly from the shelves is a book I couldn't put down. It's a mystery that twists and turns with good guys being bad and bad guys being good. The ending leaves one breathless. The point of the mystery is to find what was once the worlds most complete library, the library at Alexandria.  Does it really exist? Can it be found?

The author, Steve Berry, notes Why Preserving History Matters in his blog entry at the Huffington Post. Libraries do preserve history. Librarians share that information. The real mystery is why our culture doesn't value the collection and sharing of  knowledge?


Friday, April 20, 2012

Word arrived that "a new interface for History Reference Center is now available in GALILEO. Users can now browse subjects and popular resources as well as searching for historical topics. To limit to a time period or a Lexile reading level range, click the Advanced Search. "

A trip to History Reference Center through GALILEO pulled up the standard Ebsco search page. A search for Abraham Lincoln revealed a number of articles. Where is the "browse subjects" area? A return to the standard page, a scroll down showed a Timeline box with drop down subjects. I picked the U.S. History - Civil War and reconstruction. Over 10000 articles appeared. So how do I browse? On the left side there's a column. Scroll past 'Refine your results' and keep going. There are the options for subject and publication browsing. Click on the arrows to reveal the options. They call it a 'new interface' but it looks so much like the standard Ebsco interface that it took me awhile to figure out what was 'new'.


Students may access all Library Resource passwords (including GALILEO) by going to the CTC page
Select Quicklinks (upper right hand corner)
Select Library
Select Find Books
Put in your Student ID# and your Banner password
Select My Account (middle of the gray bar)
Select Off Campus Access link (all the Library Resource passwords are there)